INFP Traits - “The Idealists”

myersbriggspersonalitytypes:

Positive Traits:

  • Capable of deep loving and caring
  • Laid-back, go-with-the-flow kinds of people
  • Are often free-spirited
  • Often have a good sense of humor
  • Enjoyable to be around
  • Sensitive, perceptive and highly intuitive
  • Excellent at reading people
  • Loyal and committed
  • Kindhearted and warm
  • Truly concerned for and care about others
  • Seek to meet needs of others
  • Can be highly creative
  • Usually calm and even-keeled
  • Intuitively understands the feelings of others
  • Seek lifelong relationships
  • Tend to be shy, reserved and thoughtful
  • Nurturing, supportive and encouraging
  • Typically recognize and respect others’ need for space
  • Usually able to express themselves well
  • Often perfectionists
  • Primary goal is to discover their meaning in life
  • Concerned with making the world a better place
  • Continuous quest to find underlying truths and meanings
  • Service-oriented, desire to help people
  • Good listeners
  • Gifted at putting people at ease
  • Sincere and genuine
  • Tend to make great mediators
  • Have strong value system, which they will passionately and aggressively fight for if violated
  • When they adopt projects they are interested in, will often become a “cause” for them, which they will vigorously work towards
  • Disinterested in the mundane details of everyday life
  • Dislike having to deal with hard facts and logic – do not value and are ineffective at using impersonal, objective judgment (can be positive and negative)
  • Possess high ideals and high standards
  • Often gifted writers and excellent at expressing themselves through writing
  • Humanistic
  • Likely have spontaneous, wild streak

Negative Traits:

  • May have difficulty leaving an unhealthy relationship
  • May be prone to struggle with insecurity
  • Strongly dislike having their space invaded
  • Needs praise and positive affirmation from others
  • When stressed, may be prone to emotional outbursts
  • Often reserved about expressing feelings and may be awkward and uncomfortable while doing so
  • Don’t give themselves enough credit when things go well and blame themselves entirely when things go wrong – often very hard on themselves
  • Intensely dislike conflict and criticism
  • If forced to deal with conflict, they are more focused on the way things makes them feel than with what is right and wrong – don’t care if they’re “wrong,” they simply do not want to feel badly
  • Can appear to be irrational and illogical, especially in conflict situations
  • Dislike having to deal with hard facts and logic – do not value and are ineffective at using impersonal, objective judgment (can be positive and negative)
  • In group situations, may have a “control” problem where they want to take over everything because group members’ standards often aren’t as high as theirs
themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

What do you call a girl with a penis?

sunwillswallow:

sparkzter:

Her name.

reblogging again because this post has less than 4000 notes but the one about trans men has over 20k

(Source: darnganronpas)

iamtemporarytoday:

noobling:

person: Pokemon is such a childish game, why are you playing it?

me: 

me: 

me: image

i’m so fucking done with this site

femmadilemma:

just watch it

(Source: epic-vines)

floozys:

  、ゞヾ ’ “”“ ’;,
 ヾ       彡    
  ミ  ● ω ●   ミ  
~彡         ミ    
 /ソ„ , , „, ,、 ,・ヾ`

(Source: floozys)